#resilience & #grit, The Challenge completed

#resilience & #grit, The Challenge completed

Phew! The timekeeper confirms that my finish time was just under my target of five hours by 47 seconds. Earlier in the day, at 9am precisely, the start horn sounded and this year’s Seagrave Wolds Challenge (SWC) was underway.

seagrave-wolds-challenge-start

The start of the 2016 Seagrave Wolds Challenge

Held on the second Saturday in November this event is always a challenge due to the presence of mud and the distinct likelihood of rain. The SWC may only be 16 miles long but I needed resilience and grit to complete this year’s event. This year was the twelfth consecutive running of the SWC and my sixth completion. In the six times I have completed the event there have been four different routes. This shows a creative mindset to the route planners as the start and finish location is always in the Leicestershire Wolds village of Seagrave. The 2016 event was held on Saturday 12th November and was over a completely new route on mixed surfaces, taking in the Soar Valley, Mountsorrel and the scenically attractive Swithland Reservoir area. I was hoping for decent weather and an almost mud free walk just like my first SWC in 2011 but in the preceding week there was copious amounts of rain. So 2016’s SWC wasn’t going to be mud free just more muddier than usual plus the weather forecast for the Saturday was heavy rain for most of the day. With all this foresight should I bother to go? This is where one needs grit as it would be easy to stay at home be warm and dry and watch TV. However, I was in the zone to go as I prepared my gear the previous evening and my rucksack was packed and ready for action. During the walk I certainly needed resilience to contend with the mud and the weather difficulties that the day provided. The first four miles I completed in an average time of 15 minutes per mile so I hit the 4 mile check point 12 seconds over the hour mark. I was delighted with this given the conditions. Unfortunately, my target to reach the half way stage at mile 8 in under two hours didn’t materialise as when I went through this marker I was eleven minutes over. However, even with this disappointment I was still on schedule to complete the SWC in under 4.5 hours. It was not to be as the conditions took their toll and my lack of endurance fitness was beginning to take effect from mile 10. The last mile was particularly gruelling as it took me almost thirty minutes to complete!

this-way

The route is way marked throughout 

My Seagrave Wolds Challenge (SWC) 2016 performance

Mile   Time     Cumulative time swc-typical-terrain

  1.   15.12              15.12
  2.   16.45              32.00
  3.   13.29              45.25
  4.   14.46           1:00.12
  5.   19.22           1:19.33
  6.   17.08           1:36.41
  7.   20.13           1:56.54
  8.   14.41           2:11.35
  9.   17.46           2:29.21
  10.   22.52           2:52.12
  11.   17.38           3:09.50
  12.   23.36           3:33.26
  13.   17.45           3:51.11
  14.   16.35           4:07.46
  15.   21.53           4:29.39
  16.   29.34           4:59.13

Total time: 4 hours 59 minutes 13 seconds

On a personal level I am delighted I finished my sixth Seagrave Wolds Challenge. However, the SWC wouldn’t take place without the organisers, volunteers, land owners and support from Seagrave residents. So thanks to everyone involved in making the SWC a highly enjoyable event. Will I be back next year? Of course, and for 2017 the sun will shine and the terrain will be less muddier! Whatever the weather there will always be smiles from SWC supporters and crumble and custard at the finish!

swc-crumble-and-custard

What awaits every finisher – the Seagrave Wolds Challenge famous crumble and custard

For further information about this year’s and future Seagrave Wolds Challenges:

http://www.seagravewoldschallenge.co.uk/index.html

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Compare and Contrast using a Venn Diagram

Compare and Contrast using a Venn Diagram

Whilst trawling through Twitter today, 19th October 2014, I came across a post by Debbie Millar (@DebMillar24) in which she provided a link to one of her Scoop It curated pages titled “ePick & Mix”. One of these links was:

http://info.shiftelearning.com/blog/a-simple-technique-you-can-and-should-apply-to-your-elearning-courses

One of the sections was about: Comparing: Identifying any similarities or differences.

“Learners identify and describe similarities and differences among items when comparing and contrasting them. This requires identifying the most important characteristics that increase understanding of the differences and similarities of the compared concepts.”

The article goes on to say:

Human brains naturally notice differences. The comparison process helps learners identify language cues, define ideas and clarify thought processes. It’s also useful for forming or attaining concepts. Its most common use is as a way to graphically organize content.”

Then it offers a Venn diagram as an effective way to show how different things or ideas can overlap to show a compare/contrast relationship. I then clicked on the image provided and came to:

http://ldaamerica.org/graphic-organizers/

Information gained here stated that a Venn diagram is just one of many Graphic Organisers to assist in visualising an idea and mapping it as an image.

After realising the potential of a Venn diagram I thought I could apply it in relation to BTEC’s statement which uses ‘Compare and Contrast’ very often as a merit criterion. I needed to produce a Venn digram using word processing software. I use Mac Pages and came across this neat but rather unpolished video describing the way to overlap two circles and by decreasing the opacity of each circle the overlap comes clearly into view.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fp3sG3LEf8

No doubt other such videos exist for your favourite software.

Now back to application. I will use Unit 10: Skills for Land-based Outdoor and Adventurous Activities which is a unit within the Edexcel Level 3 Public Services qualification. U10‘s criterion M1 is: “Compare and contrast four different land-based outdoor and adventurous activities”. The Venn diagram attached here compares and contrasts two activities namely: orienteering and adventure walking.

Link to Venn diagram: Compare and contrast orienteering & adventure walking

It is to be hoped that you will find this example useful and it will provide ideas in other areas.

Chris Sweetman